Faculty Reading List – Summer 2017

Reading_a_book_by_the_beachDid you ever wonder what your professors read in their spare time?  They certainly don’t sit around re-reading cases do they?

Of course they don’t! We asked the faculty if they had any suggestions for summer reading, and the did!  Without further ado, here are the GSU Law Faculty Summer Reading Suggestions.  We buy all the books on the list so see the hyperlinks for book descriptions and the Leisure Collection (to the right of the Ref Desk) to borrow.

 

1.  Lynn Hogue

2.  Nirej Sekon

3. Ramsi Woodcock

4. Jonathan Todres

5. Pam Brannon

6. Jonathan Germann

7. Kris Niedringhaus

8. Meg Butler

9. William Edmundson

10. Leslie Wolf

11. Lisa Radtke Bliss

12. Julian Juergensmeyer

13.  Tim Kuhner

14. Caren Morrison

15. Yaniv Heled

 

AND, last but certainly not least

15. Patrick Parsons

 

 

Famous Filibusters

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Last week, the US Senate took historic action to change the cloture requirement to end a filibuster of Supreme Court nominees.  In the beginning, there was no cloture.  Senators could filibuster the Senate floor for as long as they liked.  However in 1973, at the urging of president Woodrow Wilson, senators adopted rule 22 which would allow cloture, or the cessation of discussion of a bill by a two thirds vote.  This threshold was reduced to our current three-fifths threshold in 1975.  Now, the Senate once again acts to reduce the cloture requirement on filibustering Supreme Court justices to a simple majority.

Nonetheless, the filibuster of the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Gorsuch is just one of many famous filibusters.  So, without further ado, here are a few famous filibusters I thought particularly entertaining.

 

  1. Strom Thurmond 1964 – Against the Civil Rights ActStrom_Thurmond

On April 11, 1964, famed South Carolina Senator Strom Thurmond began the longest filibuster on record.  In an attempt to block the Civil Rights Act, Senator Thurmond spoke on the Senate for 24 hours and 18 minutes.  The transcript of his speech is still available through the congressional record .Senator Thurmond began by reading every state’s voter intimidation laws.  He continued, switching between articles and court cases supporting his arguments.  It was reported that Senator Thurmond stopped to “relieve” himself only twice – once when he yielded the floor to Barry Goldwater for an insertion of business into the congressional record, and once when his staffers set up a bucket in the cloakroom so Senator Thurmond could keep one foot on the Senate floor. [1]  Senator Thurmond had prepared for his marathon session by taking steam baths the day before to rid his body of excess liquid. [2]  Senator Thurmond went on to become the oldest serving senator in history, dying in office at the age of 100.

 

  1. Rand Paul 2013 – Against the confirmation of John Brennan as CIA DirectorRand_Paul_Filibuster

On March 6, Rand Paul began a filibuster designed to delay voting the confirmation of John Brennan,  President Obama’s nomination to head the CIA.  Senator Paul was particularly concerned about the domestic usage of drones to attack non-combatants.  The filibuster lasted 12 hours and 52 minutes, until Paul received a letter from then Attorney General Eric Holder stating that the President did not have the authority to use a weaponized drone to kill an American non-combatant on American soil.[3]

 

  1. Huey Long 1935 – Against Not Requiring Senate Confirmation for National Recovery Act 927px-HueyPLongGestureLeadership

Senator Huey Long of Louisiana is often described as the master of the filibuster.  On June 12, 1935, he spoke for 15 hours and 35 minutes.  After noticing that many of his colleagues had fallen asleep at their desks, he suggested to John Nance Garner, who was presiding at the time, that everyone should be forced to listen to him until excused.  Garner replied that it would be “unusual cruelty” under the bill of rights.  After Senator Long ran out of prepared material, he solicited the chamber asking for “ any point on which [they need[ed] advice.”  While no senators took him up on his offer, some of the press in attendance sent down questions.  After providing said advice, , he provided his recipes for fried oysters and potlikker[4].

 

  1. “Fighting Bob” La Follette 1908- Against Arming Merchant ships To Fight Germans, Robert_La_Follette_Srand Other Things he Didn’t Like

Fighting Bob was a Wisconsin senator so opposed the outfitting of these ships that he started his own filibuster.  When angered by some procedural malarkey, LaFolette “lost his temper and came close to throwing his brass spittoon.”[5] Several in attendance reported that a number of Senators were carrying weapons and were likely to use them if the argument came to blows.  Several months later Senator La Follette was in the midst of yet another filibuster on the very last day of the session in June, against the adoption of a conference report.  After 12 hours, he sent a page to the senate restaurant for a turkey sandwich and a glass of milk “fortified with eggs” too keep up his energy.  However, the kitchen staff, who were none too happy about having to work through the night, had other plans.  When making his milk the kitchen used spoiled eggs.  After two sips, Fighting Bob soon experienced digestive difficulties and began sweating profusely.    LaFolette spoke throughout the night until his filibuster was taken over by a colleague at 7am.  The whole thing lasted 18 hours and 23 minutes.  Later analysis revealed that the spoiled eggs contained so much bacteria that it would have likely killed senator Follette if he had drank the whole glass. [6]

[1] http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2013/03/07/173736882/how-did-strom-thurmond-last-through-his-24-hour-filibuster

[2] http://www.findingdulcinea.com/news/on-this-day/July-August-08/On-this-Day–Strom-Thurmond-Ends-Longest-Filibuster-in-Senate-History.html

[3] http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/03/07/obama-administration-responds-to-paul-on-drones/

[4] https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/minute/Huey_Long_Filibusters.htm

[5] http://mentalfloss.com/article/49360/5-famous-filibusters

[6] https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/minute/A_Deadly_Drink.htm

We’re Hiring!

hiring

The Law Library is currently accepting applications for graduate research assistants (commonly known as GRAs) for the summer and fall semesters. The Law Library has two types of GRAs – Reference GRAs and Research GRAs. Position descriptions are linked below:

http://libguides.law.gsu.edu/grahiring 

 

Eligibility

Law Library GRA positions are open to all GSU law students who have completed their first two semesters of classes. Part-time students are eligible. Students applying for Summer positions must be enrolled in at least 4 hours of Summer classes. Students may apply for both types of GRA position, but cannot be hired for both positions at the same time.

Submission
Applications are due at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, April 11, 2017.

Reference GRA applicants: Email one document which includes a 1) cover letter, 2) current resume, and 3) completed availability form (available in the link above) to Patrick Parsons (pparsons@gsu.edu). Include your last name in the file name.

Research GRA applicants: Email one document which includes a 1) cover letter and 2) current resume to Patrick Parsons (pparsons@gsu.edu). Include your last name in the file name.

Paint by US Code Number : Presidential Elections

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Waterskiing Uncle Sam by Jefferson National Expansion Memorial

As we near the end of the US Presidential race, elections have taken center stage in American consciousness.  Headlines about recounts and possible non-concession have brought back memories of the Bush-Gore legal battles over Florida and a general re-interest in election law. But, where exactly does election law come from?  While the nuts and bolts of the actual elections is left to the states, the United States Code lays out a very particular, partly unknown, and maybe even esoteric set of steps required to elect the Preside of the United States.  So, come with me on an educational and entertaining journey through Title 3, sections 1-20 of the US code. Make sure to hold on to your hats- things might get weird.

 

3 U.S.C. § 1  – Time of appointing electors

This is straightforward, mostly.  The states appoint their electors, the people who actually elect the president, on the “Tuesday after the next Monday in November” following the presidential election.  Yes, you read that right.  States don’t even pick their electors until after the election. Contrary to popular belief, the citizens of the US do not actually elect the president, electors do.  Each state decides how the vote of their citizens effects the votes of the electors.  Typically, the electors select whichever candidate wins the state.  However, Nebraska and Maine election laws allow the states to split their electoral votes proportionally according to the popular vote.

 

3 U.S.C. § 2 – Failure to make a choice on proscribed day

If the state fails to choose electors on the proscribed day, the job then falls to the state legislature.

 

3 U.S.C. § 3 – Number of electors

This is probably the best known of the US election statutes.  The states get a number of electors equal to their number of Senators and Representatives.

 

3 U.S.C. § 4 (2012) – Vacancies in Electoral College

States can fill any vacancies in their electors when those electors meet to actually vote.

 

3 U.S.C. § 5  – Determination of controversy as to appointment of electors

This one is strange.  If the states choose, they can create procedures for settling any controversy in the picking of electors.  However, 3 U.S.C. § 5 requires that these procedures make a determination at least six days before the state electors meet to cast their votes. Don’t want to hold up the entire US Presidential election because of a few people fighting over who gets to be their states proxy vote now, do we?

 

3 U.S.C. § 6  – Credentials of electors; transmission to Archivist of the United States and to Congress; public inspection

Ok, this one is a bit long, and weird.  The executive of each state, typically the Governor, “as soon as practicable” must give “a certificate of ascertainment” , by certified mail, of all the state’s electors to the Archivist of the United States.  If the electors are chosen by votes, the governor has to include the number of votes too.  The governor must also send six duplicates of this certificate to each of the state’s electors.  If there was a controversy, the Governor must also send a certificate stating the outcome of that controversy.  The Archivist must keep all of these certificates for at least one year for public inspection, and give copies to both the house and senate of each and every certificate received.  I’m pretty sure certificate means letter or document in “Old Timey Government English”, and this whole electoral process stems from a time when electors had more power (ie. they were less likely to listen to the state’s voters.)  However, it a nice piece of election tradition as well as a reminder of American history, so, why not? Lets keep going!

 

3 U.S.C. § 7 (2012) – Meeting and vote of electors

Finally, an easy one.  Electors shall meet and give their votes on the first Monday after the second Wednesday in December next following their appointment at such place in each State.  That’s right, again.   The entirety of the nation is well aware of who is going to be the president well before they are actually elected by the electors.

 

3 U.S.C. § 8 – Manner of Voting

Another easy one.  The electors vote as directed by the constitution.  We’ll save the constitution for another day.

 

3 U.S.C. § 9 – Certificates of votes for the President and Vice President

The electors must make and sign six certificates, with each certificate containing two lists; one for president and the other for the vice president.  Yes, for each electoral vote they must provide six signed certificates.   They also attach one of the lists of electors given to them by the executive of the state, or Governor, to each certificate.

 

3 U.S.C. § 10 – Sealing and endorsing certificates

Another easy one- they have to seal and endorse the certificates.  That’s all this law says.  You’d think they could have just rolled that into § 9.

 

3 U.S.C. § 11 – Disposition of certificates

What do they do with all these new certificates?  § 11 and I are both glad you asked.  The electors deliver the certificates as follows: one to the President of the Senate, one to the Secretary of the State, two to the archivist of the US, and one to the judge of the district where the electors assembled.  The archivist must keep one of the copies in case the president of the senate requests it, and the other for public inspection.

 

3 U.S.C. § 12– Failure of certificates of electors to reach President of the Senate or Archivist of the United States; demand on State for certificate

This seems to be another section of the law that was much more important before you could pick up a phone and ask the governor; “hey! Governor!  Where are all the certificates?” If the certificates fail to arrive to the President of the Senate or the Archivist by the fourth Wednesday in December, probably a week after the voting, The President of the senate should request the backup certificates from the Secretary of the State.  § 12 also says that the Archivist should serve as back up, and do the requesting if the President of the Senate  is absent.

 

3 U.S.C. § 13 –  Same; demand on district judge for certificate

The reason for the six certificates, and the preference by the drafters for multiple contingency plans, is becoming more evident.  If the President of the Senate or the Archivist strike out with the Governor, they then should ask the District Judge.

 

3 U.S.C. § 14 – Forfeiture for messenger’s neglect of duty

So you were supposed to deliver the certificates to the President of the Senate, or Archivist, and you forgot?  Do not pass go.  Forfeit $1000.  Seriously. If you mess this up, by law, you must forfeit $1000.

 

3 U.S.C. § 15 – Counting electoral votes in congress

Where: The sixth day of January succeeding every meeting of the electors, The House of Representatives

Who: Congress, both houses, the whole thing.

When? 1:00 pm

What: Counting the votes.  This section lays out, in tedious minutia, the rules for counting the electoral votes.  This whole thing is too long to cover here, but some of the highlights are:  The President of the Senate open the envelopes.  The state’s votes are counted in alphabetical order, starting with the letter “A.”  As they are opened, the envelopes should be immediately handed to two previously appointed tellers.  The counts are entered into both the House and Senate Journals.  Objections must be made in writing, and be signed by a member of both the House and Senate.  After all objections to a vote are received and read, the Senate leaves the House so each can debate independently.  But, so long as the electors were correctly certified, there’s not much either body can do.

 

3 U.S.C.A. § 16 –  Same; seats for officers and Members of two Houses in joint meeting

But where  is everyone going to sit?  Thank goodness, the statutes actually tell us.  President of the Senate: Speakers Chair; Speaker – on the Presidents left;  Senators – the hall on the Right; Representatives – anywhere the Senators are not sitting; Tellers, Secretary of Senate, Clerk of The House – at the Clerks Desk;  Other various officers – in front of the Clerk’s desk and upon each side of the Speaker’s platform.  This section also states that they can’t dissolve the meeting until all the votes are counted and the winner declared.  They cannot take a recess unless they have some question about the votes.  Even then, they cannot declare a recess beyond the next calendar day, Sunday excepted, at 10:00 “in the forenoon.”  If they haven’t completed the counting by the fifth calendar day, they cannot take any more recesses.

 

3 U.S.C.A. § 17- Same; limit of debate in each House

If the two houses separate to decide on an objection, as per § 15, each Senator or Member can only speak for five minutes, and not more than once.  The whole debate cannot go on more than two hours.  Limited filibustering only.

 

3 U.S.C.A. § 18 –  Same; parliamentary procedure at joint meeting

The president of the senate has the power to preserve order.

 

3 U.S.C.A. § 19 –  Vacancy in offices of both President and Vice President; officers eligible to act

Like the constitution, we’ll deal with vacancies at another time.

 

3 U.S.C.A. § 20 – Resignation or Refusal of Office

….must be in writing and delivered to the secretary of state.  Thank goodness, this is over.

 

 

Law School for Dummies, and Smarties

I have good news and bad news for all you law students out there. The good news is you still have about 1/3 of your summer break left. The bad news is that means Georgia State College of Law classes start in about a month, with our new students starting orientation August 8 and our returning students beginning classes on August 15. I know, it went by quickly for me too.
So, for this post I wanted to talk about some resources from the library that can help you do better in your law school classes. I know what you’re thinking. “Won’t all of the library resources help me do better in law school?” Short answer: maybe. While I’m sure everyone will need to find a section in the O.C.G.A. or U.S. Code, locating regulations from before the days of the C.F.R probably won’t mean a whole lot. What I’m talking about are resources that will actually help you “do” law school.
Law students often struggle because they do not understand the expectations of their work, their answers, or themselves. What should you be getting out of the cases you read? How do legal rules work together? What does a good law school exam answer look like? What’s the deal with these weird exam hypotheticals and is there a better way to approach them? Luckily, there are a number of books that answer these types of questions. Many students spend so much time making outlines and memorizing that they don’t ever think strategically about how they study and learn the law. Do yourself a favor and take an hour to skim some of these books. At the very least, they will give you some useful suggestions and at most change the way you approach your legal education.gtm

Getting to Maybe: How to Excel on Law School Exams by Jeremy R. Paul and Richard Michael Fischl

Professors Fischl and Paul explain law school exams in ways no one has before, all with an eye toward improving the reader’s performance. The book begins by describing the difference between educational cultures that praise students for ‘right answers,’ and the law school culture that rewards nuanced analysis of ambiguous situations in which more than one approach may be correct. Enormous care is devoted to explaining precisely how and why legal analysis frequently produces such perplexing situations

reading like a lawyer

Reading Like a Lawyer : time-saving strategies for reading law like an expert by Ruth McKinney

The ability to read law well is a critical, indispensable skill that can make or break the academic career of any aspiring lawyer. Fortunately, the ability to read law well (quickly and accurately) is a skill that can be acquired through knowledge and practice. The sooner the student masters these skills, the greater the rewards. Using seven specific reading strategies, reinforced with hands-on exercises at the end of each chapter, this book shows students how they can read law efficiently, effectively, powerfully, and confidently.

 

cracking caseCracking the Case Method: Legal Analysis for Law School Success by Paul Bergman

Cracking the Case Method is a concise and down-to-earth guide to the intellectual content of law school instruction, particularly in the first year. Readers will discover why and how law school instructors use appellate court cases as vehicles for teaching legal analysis. This book explains that legal analysis is a process by which judges and lawyers use argument (or rhetoric) to connect stories to legal conclusions, and reveals how to read judges’ appellate court opinions as arguments rather than merely as sources of rules. To succeed in law school, students have to apply analytical skills to novel stories by crafting arguments of their own, both in class meetings and when answering final examination essay questions. This book promotes readers’ ability to apply analytical skills by: Demonstrating how to “brief” cases in a way that captures both arguments and rules; Explaining and illustrating common types of arguments; Using actual law school classroom dialogues annotated by the authors to explain how instructors use classes to further law schools’ goal of teaching argument skills.

 

 

 

Faculty Summer Reading Suggestions

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Summer is fast approaching.  Before you know it the trials and tribulations of the academic year will be behind us, exchanged for internships, jobs, conferences, and hopefully vacation.  Many of us use this time to catch up on our leisure reading.  If this is you, the GSU law faculty would like to suggest a few of their favorite titles.  All of these titles will appear in the Law Library leisure collection.

 

Jessica Gabel Cino

Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

 

Washington’s Spies: The Story of America’s First Spy Ring by Alexander Rose

Based on remarkable new research, acclaimed historian Alexander Rose brings to life the true story of the spy ring that helped America win the Revolutionary War. For the first time, Rose takes us beyond the battlefront and deep into the shadowy underworld of double agents and triple crosses, covert operations and code breaking, and unmasks the courageous, flawed men who inhabited this wilderness of mirrors—including the spymaster at the heart of it all.

 

Neil Kinkopf

A Man for All Seasons by Robert Bolt

The classic play about Sir Thomas More, the 16th-century Chancellor of England, who refused to endorse King Henry VIII’s wish to divorce his wife Catherine of Aragon, who did not bear him a son, so that he could marry Anne Boleyn, the sister of his former mistress. The play portrays More as a man of principle, envied by rivals such as Thomas Cromwell and loved by the common people and by his family.

 

Jonathan Germann

High Output Management by Andrew S. Grove

The essential skill of creating and maintaining new businesses—the art of the entrepreneur—can be summed up in a single word: managing. In High Output Management, Andrew S. Grove, former chairman and CEO (and employee number three) of Intel, shares his perspective on how to build and run a company.

 

The Moth (Podcast).  https://themoth.org/stories/my-first-day-at-the-yankees

Founded in 1997, the organization presents storytelling events across the United States and abroad, often featuring prominent literary and cultural personalities. The Moth offers a weekly podcast and in 2009 launched a national public radio show, The Moth Radio Hour, which won a 2010 Peabody Award. The 2013 story collection The Moth: 50 True Stories reached #22 on The New York Times Paperback Nonfiction Best-Seller List.

 

Pam Brannon

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by  Jonas Jonasson.

It all starts on the one-hundredth birthday of Allan Karlsson. Sitting quietly in his room in an old people’s home, he is waiting for the party he-never-wanted-anyway to begin. Slowly but surely Allan climbs out of his bedroom window, into the flowerbed (in his slippers) and makes his getaway. And so begins his picaresque and unlikely journey involving criminals, several murders, a suitcase full of cash, and incompetent police. As his escapades unfold, we learn something of Allan’s earlier life in which – remarkably – he helped to make the atom bomb, became friends with American presidents, Russian tyrants, and Chinese leaders, and was a participant behind the scenes in many key events of the twentieth century.

 

Russell Covey

Ghettoside by Jill Leovy

An engaging tale told by an L.A. Times crime reporter about the difficulties of investigating homicide cases in inner-city minority communities. Leovy casts light on problems such as the under-resourcing of policing in the urban ghetto that go far toward explaining the violence crisis that has long afflicted black communities.

Serial, Season One (podcast) –  https://serialpodcast.org/season-one

If you haven’t listened to it yet, do so. It’s awesome entertainment, examining the case against Adnan Syed, a possibly wrongfully convicted man currently serving a life sentence in Maryland for the murder of his ex-high-school girlfriend.

Undisclosed (podcast) –  http://undisclosed-podcast.com/

This is a follow-up podcast on Serial, and digs into the case in gory legal detail. For Serial enthusiasts, it is a must-listen, and it digs up some truly shocking new details that were not discussed on Serial.

 

Bill Edmundson

Egil’s Saga, author uncertain – http://sagadb.org/egils_saga.en

Egil’s Saga, is I think the best of the Icelandic sagas. If you are unfamiliar with the sagas, you may be surprised by the simplicity and directness of the narration. “Game of Thrones” fans are probably aware that the story lines owe a lot to the sagas. The aspect that makes them especially apt for law students is the way that Icelandic law structures the conflicts that drive the story.  An excellent overview is Bloodtaking and Peacemaking: Feud, Law, and Society in Saga Iceland by Michigan law professor William Ian Miller.

 

Meg Butler

Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter

Meg’s top pick for summer reading would be anything by local author Karin Slaughter.  She writes compelling thrillers, often set in Atlanta or in Georgia. Her most recent is Pretty Girls, a stand-alone novel just released in paperback this week.  Slaughter is a library champion, founding the Save the Libraries project, which has raised over $250,000 for the Dekalb County Library Foundation. “On Second Thought” posted audio of Celeste Headlee’s interesting recent interview with Slaughter—the author explains why she sets her novels in Atlanta and Georgia.

Jack Williams

The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein

Enzo knows he is different from other dogs: a philosopher with a nearly human soul (and an obsession with opposable thumbs), he has educated himself by watching television extensively, and by listening very closely to the words of his master, Denny Swift, an up-and-coming race car driver.A heart-wrenching but deeply funny and ultimately uplifting story of family, love, loyalty, and hope, The Art of Racing in the Rain is a beautifully crafted and captivating look at the wonders and absurdities of human life…as only a dog could tell it.

Kris Niedringhaus

Citizen: an American lyric by Claudia Rankine

Move over, ethereal poetry. Make room for a collection from Claudia Rankine titled “Citizen: An American Lyric.” Rankine is Jamaican-born, raised both there and in New York. Her book was a finalist for the National Book Award. And while Rankine did not win last night, our reviewer Tess Taylor says, this powerful collection is the perfect book to appreciate the racial dynamics at play today.

How to be a woman by Caitlin Moran

Part memoir, part modern feminist discussion, Times columnist Caitlin Moran’s book How to be a Woman tackles what it means to be female in the 21st century.

Trigger warning: short fictions and disturbances by Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman pierces the veil of reality to reveal the enigmatic, shadowy world that lies beneath. Trigger Warning includes previously published pieces of short fiction—stories, verse, and a very special Doctor Who story that was written for the fiftieth anniversary of the beloved series in 2013—as well “Black Dog,” a new tale that revisits the world of American Gods, exclusive to this collection.

Patrick Parsons

Blood Meridian: Or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthy (No Country for Old Men, The Road)

An epic novel of the violence and depravity that attended America’s westward expansion, Blood Meridian brilliantly subverts the conventions of the Western novel and the mythology of the “wild west.” Based on historical events that took place on the Texas-Mexico border in the 1850s, it traces the fortunes of the Kid, a fourteen-year-old Tennesseean who stumbles into the nightmarish world where Indians are being murdered and the market for their scalps is thriving.

Yelping With Cormac McCarthy (Tumblr)

If you liked Blood Meridian, you’ll love these McCarthy stylized Yelp reviews.

The Last Waltz (movie, concert documentary)

A wise man once said it’s better to burn out than fade away, and on Thanksgiving Day of 1976, the Band, one of the best live acts of the rock era went out in a blaze of glory that was called The Last Waltz.After spending more than 15 years on the road – first as a backing band and then as a recording act in their own right – they called it quits as a touring entity by leading an all-star ensemble through an epic night of food, dancing and rock ‘n’ roll. Commemorated by director Martin Scorsese, the event would later serve as the grist for one of the most beloved concert films of all time.

 

 

Pet Pictures and Student Surveys

Library SurveyBig things are happening here at the GSU Law Library.  Well, maybe not big things, but important things.

First, we’re in the midst of our annual student survey.  Every year we send out a survey to the students to get their take on things.  We use this information to make all kinds of decisions from library policies to programming to  activities.  Think of it this way- for just 5 minutes of your time you get a better, more comfortable, and more responsive library.  That’s worth it, right?  If you think it is, the survey is available right here.

Next, we need your pet pictures.  To lighten the mood during finals, the library will be displaying student, faculty, and staff pet pictures on the public access computers and active learning area screen.  We already have quite a few faculty and staff submissions, so don’t miss out on showing off your favorite pet. Send your pictures to Patrick Parsons at pparsons@gsu.edu.

Big Lola

Big Lola Parsons