Library System Improvements

The Law Library, with University Library, will be changing the interface for our catalog. If you use gilfind.gsu.edu or gil.gsu.edu to search for library items, you will be redirected to our new search system on Friday, May 26.

The new system offers some improvements! You will be able to log in to view your library account using your campus ID and password. When searching, you will be able to narrow and focus your results list using fewer clicks. The new system should also make it easier to request items from other University System of Georgia libraries.

We in the Law Library look forward to working with you as we implement this new system!

PrimoView

Screen capture showing results of a search in the new system. May 22, 2017.

Faculty Reading List – Summer 2017

Reading_a_book_by_the_beachDid you ever wonder what your professors read in their spare time?  They certainly don’t sit around re-reading cases do they?

Of course they don’t! We asked the faculty if they had any suggestions for summer reading, and the did!  Without further ado, here are the GSU Law Faculty Summer Reading Suggestions.  We buy all the books on the list so see the hyperlinks for book descriptions and the Leisure Collection (to the right of the Ref Desk) to borrow.

 

1.  Lynn Hogue

2.  Nirej Sekon

3. Ramsi Woodcock

4. Jonathan Todres

5. Pam Brannon

6. Jonathan Germann

7. Kris Niedringhaus

8. Meg Butler

9. William Edmundson

10. Leslie Wolf

11. Lisa Radtke Bliss

12. Julian Juergensmeyer

13.  Tim Kuhner

14. Caren Morrison

15. Yaniv Heled

 

AND, last but certainly not least

15. Patrick Parsons

 

 

Summer and post-graduation password use

As exams draw closer, so does summer work and graduation. Curious about what you can do with your Bloomberg Law, Lexis, or Westlaw passwords? Read on…

Summer use for returning students:Beach view
Bloomberg Law and Lexis passwords can be used for any purpose, without restrictions, over the summer. Westlaw can be used for non-commercial research such as coursework; GRA work; Law Review, Moot Court, or STLA research; non-profit work; clinical work; or work for an official College of Law externship. Westlaw, through your academic account, cannot be used when a client will be billed.

Post-graduation use:
Bloomberg Law and Lexis are available for 6 months after graduation. Westlaw provides a 6 month extension after graduation for usage up to 60 hours per month. You will see a pop up when you log on to Westlaw beginning a couple of months before you graduate.

Lexis is also providing a graduation gift of a free subscription to one of three services. You will be able to select a free subscription to Law360, Lexis Practice Advisor, or Lexis for Microsoft Office. If you are doing public interest work for a 501(c)(3), excluding government work or law firm work representing a non-profit, you may qualify for a Lexis ASPIRE ID. For more information on Lexis graduate programs, go to lexisnexis.com/grad-access.

If you have questions, please contact the appropriate College of Law representative.
Bloomberg Law: Terry Stedman
Lexis: Tracy Templeton
Westlaw: Sue Moore

Famous Filibusters

Robert_La_Follette_Sr

Last week, the US Senate took historic action to change the cloture requirement to end a filibuster of Supreme Court nominees.  In the beginning, there was no cloture.  Senators could filibuster the Senate floor for as long as they liked.  However in 1973, at the urging of president Woodrow Wilson, senators adopted rule 22 which would allow cloture, or the cessation of discussion of a bill by a two thirds vote.  This threshold was reduced to our current three-fifths threshold in 1975.  Now, the Senate once again acts to reduce the cloture requirement on filibustering Supreme Court justices to a simple majority.

Nonetheless, the filibuster of the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Gorsuch is just one of many famous filibusters.  So, without further ado, here are a few famous filibusters I thought particularly entertaining.

 

  1. Strom Thurmond 1964 – Against the Civil Rights ActStrom_Thurmond

On April 11, 1964, famed South Carolina Senator Strom Thurmond began the longest filibuster on record.  In an attempt to block the Civil Rights Act, Senator Thurmond spoke on the Senate for 24 hours and 18 minutes.  The transcript of his speech is still available through the congressional record .Senator Thurmond began by reading every state’s voter intimidation laws.  He continued, switching between articles and court cases supporting his arguments.  It was reported that Senator Thurmond stopped to “relieve” himself only twice – once when he yielded the floor to Barry Goldwater for an insertion of business into the congressional record, and once when his staffers set up a bucket in the cloakroom so Senator Thurmond could keep one foot on the Senate floor. [1]  Senator Thurmond had prepared for his marathon session by taking steam baths the day before to rid his body of excess liquid. [2]  Senator Thurmond went on to become the oldest serving senator in history, dying in office at the age of 100.

 

  1. Rand Paul 2013 – Against the confirmation of John Brennan as CIA DirectorRand_Paul_Filibuster

On March 6, Rand Paul began a filibuster designed to delay voting the confirmation of John Brennan,  President Obama’s nomination to head the CIA.  Senator Paul was particularly concerned about the domestic usage of drones to attack non-combatants.  The filibuster lasted 12 hours and 52 minutes, until Paul received a letter from then Attorney General Eric Holder stating that the President did not have the authority to use a weaponized drone to kill an American non-combatant on American soil.[3]

 

  1. Huey Long 1935 – Against Not Requiring Senate Confirmation for National Recovery Act 927px-HueyPLongGestureLeadership

Senator Huey Long of Louisiana is often described as the master of the filibuster.  On June 12, 1935, he spoke for 15 hours and 35 minutes.  After noticing that many of his colleagues had fallen asleep at their desks, he suggested to John Nance Garner, who was presiding at the time, that everyone should be forced to listen to him until excused.  Garner replied that it would be “unusual cruelty” under the bill of rights.  After Senator Long ran out of prepared material, he solicited the chamber asking for “ any point on which [they need[ed] advice.”  While no senators took him up on his offer, some of the press in attendance sent down questions.  After providing said advice, , he provided his recipes for fried oysters and potlikker[4].

 

  1. “Fighting Bob” La Follette 1908- Against Arming Merchant ships To Fight Germans, Robert_La_Follette_Srand Other Things he Didn’t Like

Fighting Bob was a Wisconsin senator so opposed the outfitting of these ships that he started his own filibuster.  When angered by some procedural malarkey, LaFolette “lost his temper and came close to throwing his brass spittoon.”[5] Several in attendance reported that a number of Senators were carrying weapons and were likely to use them if the argument came to blows.  Several months later Senator La Follette was in the midst of yet another filibuster on the very last day of the session in June, against the adoption of a conference report.  After 12 hours, he sent a page to the senate restaurant for a turkey sandwich and a glass of milk “fortified with eggs” too keep up his energy.  However, the kitchen staff, who were none too happy about having to work through the night, had other plans.  When making his milk the kitchen used spoiled eggs.  After two sips, Fighting Bob soon experienced digestive difficulties and began sweating profusely.    LaFolette spoke throughout the night until his filibuster was taken over by a colleague at 7am.  The whole thing lasted 18 hours and 23 minutes.  Later analysis revealed that the spoiled eggs contained so much bacteria that it would have likely killed senator Follette if he had drank the whole glass. [6]

[1] http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2013/03/07/173736882/how-did-strom-thurmond-last-through-his-24-hour-filibuster

[2] http://www.findingdulcinea.com/news/on-this-day/July-August-08/On-this-Day–Strom-Thurmond-Ends-Longest-Filibuster-in-Senate-History.html

[3] http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/03/07/obama-administration-responds-to-paul-on-drones/

[4] https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/minute/Huey_Long_Filibusters.htm

[5] http://mentalfloss.com/article/49360/5-famous-filibusters

[6] https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/minute/A_Deadly_Drink.htm

We’re Hiring!

hiring

The Law Library is currently accepting applications for graduate research assistants (commonly known as GRAs) for the summer and fall semesters. The Law Library has two types of GRAs – Reference GRAs and Research GRAs. Position descriptions are linked below:

http://libguides.law.gsu.edu/grahiring 

 

Eligibility

Law Library GRA positions are open to all GSU law students who have completed their first two semesters of classes. Part-time students are eligible. Students applying for Summer positions must be enrolled in at least 4 hours of Summer classes. Students may apply for both types of GRA position, but cannot be hired for both positions at the same time.

Submission
Applications are due at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, April 11, 2017.

Reference GRA applicants: Email one document which includes a 1) cover letter, 2) current resume, and 3) completed availability form (available in the link above) to Patrick Parsons (pparsons@gsu.edu). Include your last name in the file name.

Research GRA applicants: Email one document which includes a 1) cover letter and 2) current resume to Patrick Parsons (pparsons@gsu.edu). Include your last name in the file name.

Spring Exams

Spring is in the air.  Daylight savings time has begun and you can enjoy an extra amount of evening light.  Which also means, exams are just around the corner.

stadium_as_an_exam_venue

The library has digital study aids to assist in your exam preparation.

  • Too many choices?  There is a research guide for that.
  • Need off-campus access?  There is a link for that.
  • Want to practice on an old exam?  There is a place for that too.